Posts Tagged Under: AMD

Building a PC with the AMD Athlon X4 940, X4 950 and X4 970

The final piece in AMD’s 7th generation CPU refresh for the AM4 platform comes in the form of three new Athlon processors: the X4 940, X4 950, and X4 970. Unlike the two sets of A-series CPUs (see our 35W and 65W builds), these new Athlons do not come with onboard GPUs.

The advantage, however, is that these are unlocked cores and can be overclocked much harder. So read on to find out exactly what you can build with the new AMD Athlon chips!

 

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Intel Core i5-8600K vs Ryzen 5 1600 vs Ryzen 7 1700 vs. i5-7600K

 

The Intel Coffee Lake Core i5-8600K

With this month’s Coffee Lake release, Intel finally decided to increase the amount of CPU cores they offer to mainstream consumers. The company’s newest Core i5 CPU, the i5-8600K has been upgraded to 6 cores from last generation’s 4-core i5-7600K. In theory, that should mean significantly better multithreaded performance in addition to Intel’s typical single-threaded dominance. But how does the 8600K compare to the previous generation, as well as the price-equivalent chips from AMD?

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What is Hyper-Threading and Simultaneous MultiThreading?

With the newly released 8th Generation CPUs from Intel, one feature has gone missing from the Core i3 models: Hyper-Threading (HT). For example, the new Intel i3-8100 features 4 physical cores and 4 threads, whereas the previous generation’s i3-7100 featured 2 physical cores and 4 threads.

What is Hyper-Threading, and is it any different from AMDs Simultaneous Multi-Threading?

What is the difference between having a 2-core Hyper-Threaded CPU or a 4-core CPU without Hyper-Threading?

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Intel Core i7-8700K vs AMD Ryzen 7 vs Intel Core i7-7700K

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Intel’s Coffee Lake CPUs are part of the 8th generation of processors.

Last week, Intel released their Coffee Lake-based 8th generation CPUs. Intel has been usually refreshing their processors at the beginning of each year, but this one happened a few months early. (Earlier in July, Intel’s X299-based Skylake-X CPUs also experienced a rushed launch.)

It seems that AMD’s Ryzen CPUs really did light a fire under Intel, with the underdog AMD slowly earning the hearts of both reviewers and customers around the globe. But how does Intel’s newest Coffee Lake mainstream flagship CPU, the i7-8700K, compare to AMD’s Ryzen 7 processors, as well as the previous generation’s i7-7700K?

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Building a PC with the AMD A6-9500, A8-9600, A10-9700, and A12-9800

AMD recently refreshed their entry-level CPU range, and we’re quite happy with the results. We’ve already taken a look at their new 35W CPUs, and now we’d like to turn our attention to the more powerful (and power hungry) range from AMD. Interestingly enough, a number of these CPU’s have a configurable thermal design power (cTDP) of 45W from the default 65W.

This article will suggest a number of builds that could best utilize these new 65W CPUs. Prices for these builds come in between $313 and $424. So, read on to see for yourself!

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Building a PC with AMD’s A6-9500E, A10-9700E, and A12-9800E

Now that the dust has settled with AMD’s great releases of its Ryzen and Threadripper CPUs, the manufacturer has quietly refreshed its entry-level CPUs. Although they’re not built on the Zen chip architecture, they do use the new AM4 socket. This provides us builders with new features, and very importantly, a simple path to future CPU upgrades. So with this in mind, sit back as I review the new 35W CPUs and what you can build with them!

This article covers builds using the A6-9500E ($65), A10-9700E ($85), and A12-9800E ($110). The total build price comes in anywhere from $330 to $450, so these are great entry-level PCs. You can see our builds for the new 65W CPUs here.

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AMD Threadripper 1900X vs Intel i7-7820X

AMD’s marketing slide comparing the Ryzen CPUs to their competition.

Since March 2017, AMD’s new Ryzen CPUs have been very successfully entering the mainstream CPU market. With the recent release of their Threadripper line, AMD has also entered the HEDT (high-end desktop) segment, and was very successful in offering Intel meaningful competition (see Threadripper 1950X vs Core i9-7900X).

However, many have questioned the need for the latest Threadripper processor, the 8-core 16-thread 1900X, on the high-end X399 platform. After all, a cheaper CPU with the same core count, the Ryzen 7 1800X already exists on the much cheaper AM4 platform. Coming in at $550, its direct competition would be the 8-core 16-thread Intel Core i7-7820X, priced at $600. How do these processors compare?

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