AMD Ryzen 5 1600X and 1600 vs. i5-7600K and 7500

After releasing the extensively reviewed 8-core 16-thread Ryzen 7 CPUs last month, AMD marked April as the month of the Ryzen 5 processors. This tier of the Zen microarchitecture-based CPUs includes 4-core and 6-core hyper threaded processors, in a price range of $169-$249.

Today, we will compare the Ryzen 5 1600X ($250) and 1600 ($220) to their price equivalents from Intel: the i5-7600K ($240) and i5-7500 ($200).

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Ryzen 5 CPUs Released, Added to Logical Increments

This week, AMD launched their exciting Ryzen 5 CPUs, which include two 6-core hyperthreaded chips (the 1600X and 1600) and two 4-core hyperthreaded chips (the 1500X and 1400). These CPUs are now among our recommendations on the Logical Increments homepage, marking a welcome return for AMD to the mid-range CPU space.

Long story short: We have added the the R5 1500X and 1600 to our Great tier, while the R5 1600 and 1600X now appear in our Excellent tier. As a result, the Ryzen chips have shaken up our once Intel-dominated mid-range CPU recommendations, and knocked the Intel i5-7400 completely off our list.

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Building a PC with the Ryzen 5 1500X and 1400

This week, AMD released its exciting new Ryzen 5 series of CPUs, which includes two 6-core models (the 1600X and 1600) and two 4-core models (the 1500X and 1400). These new CPUs are giving Intel’s offerings some serious competition in the mid-range CPU space.

Yesterday, we put together some builds for the 6-core 1600X and 1600, and today we’ll be doing the same for the 4-core 1500X and 1400.

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Building a PC with the Ryzen 5 1600X and 1600

The 6-core Ryzen 5 1600X and 1600 are an interesting pair for PC builders.

For both gaming and content creation, having a 6-core/12-thread CPU for the $220-250 price point is excellent. As such, we’re going to create two powerful example builds to give you an idea for what you can make yourself.

The 1600X and 1600 can be used interchangeably with the two builds, so feel free to swap as you see fit!

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PC Build Success Story: Gaming and Video Editing PC

I’m a contributing writer for Logical Increments, but I’m also a fan and a user of LI’s build guides and other resources. Some of the research for my own workstation PC build happened on this very site in the middle of 2016. The video above is a walkthrough of my PC building experience last October, which resulted from that research here and elsewhere.

Below you can find some more details on the build and video, as well as a full parts list.

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AMD Ryzen 7 1700 vs. Intel i7-7700K

The Ryzen 7 1700 is — just as the 1800X and 1700X — an 8-core 16-thread processor. Unlike the X-series CPUs though, the 1700 only has an XFR (extended frequency range) of 50 Mhz, whereas both the 1800X and 1700X can boost up to 100 Mhz higher on a single a core. The clockspeeds are also lower, with the 1700 working in a range of 3.0 to 3.7 Ghz, with the TDP set at 65 W. Otherwise, all these chips are basically the same, including their ability to overclock.

In our previous articles we talked about the launch of AMD’s new Ryzen 7 CPUs, built a few systems with these new processors(here, here, and here) and compared the Ryzen 7 1800X and 1700X to their respective competitors in terms of price. Today we will take a look at how AMD’s cheapest Ryzen 7 offering, the $330 Ryzen 7 1700, compares to Intel’s price equivalent: the $340 i7-7700K.

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AMD Ryzen 7 1700X vs. Intel i7-6800K and i7-7700K

The second-best CPU in the Ryzen 7 line-up is the 1700X. Just like the flagship Ryzen 7 1800X, the 1700X has 8 cores, 16 threads and a wider extended frequency range (up to 100 MHz). But unlike the 1800X, the 1700X runs at a lower 3.4 base and 3.8 GHz boost (3.9 GHz with XFR). In fact, the only things different between these two CPUs are the base and boost frequencies — all other specs being the same.

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Building a PC with the GTX 1080 Ti

NVIDIA has just released the GTX 1080 Ti, with the company claiming that their new card is up to 35% faster than the already beastly GTX 1080 in some instances. If you’re going for an all-out gaming PC, look no further.

We’ve crafted three different PC builds to take advantage of NVIDIA’s new powerhouse graphics card: One with an ATX Full tower, one with an ATX Mid Tower, and finally a small form factor build. The ATX builds are using AMD’s newly released Ryzen 7 1800X and 1700X chips to make well-rounded workstation builds, while the SFF build will be using an i7-7700K, still the best gaming CPU.

All the builds are targeted at 1440p or 4K gaming, which is where the lower single-threaded performance of the Ryzen CPUs is less of an issue. Click on the links to go directly to the product page.

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