Posts in Category: pc hardware

The Best 4K Monitors, and How to Choose a 4K Monitor

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(Note: If you want to skip to our recommended 4K monitors below, scroll down to “Our favorite 4K monitors.”)

For desktop PC users, 1080p (1920×1080) monitors are ubiquitous today, but that was not always the case. A little more than ten years ago, they were just starting to hit the market. Monitors with an aspect ratio of 16:10 (for instance, 1920×1200) first started appearing back in 2004, with 16:9 (1080p) monitors coming a year or two after.

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AMD Ryzen 5 1500X & 1400 vs. Intel i5-7400 & i3-7350K

This month, AMD launched multiple Ryzen 5 processors. The 1600X and 1600 are sub-$300 6-core 12-thread CPUs that pose some healthy competition to Intel’s i5-7600K and i5-7500.

On the other hand, the sub-$200 Ryzen 5 1500X and 1400 have 4 cores and 8 threads. They compete more with Intel’s locked i5-7400 and the unlocked 2-core, 4-thread i3-7350K CPUs, neither of which we recommend at their current price points.

The Ryzen 5 1500X comes with a Wraith Spire cooler, the Ryzen 5 1400 with a Wraith Stealth. The Intel i5 7400 comes with a stock Intel cooler and the i3 7350K doesn’t include any cooler at all.

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AMD Ryzen 5 1600X and 1600 vs. i5-7600K and 7500

After releasing the extensively reviewed 8-core 16-thread Ryzen 7 CPUs last month, AMD marked April as the month of the Ryzen 5 processors. This tier of the Zen microarchitecture-based CPUs includes 4-core and 6-core hyper threaded processors, in a price range of $169-$249.

Today, we will compare the Ryzen 5 1600X ($250) and 1600 ($220) to their price equivalents from Intel: the i5-7600K ($240) and i5-7500 ($200).

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Ryzen 5 CPUs Released, Added to Logical Increments

This week, AMD launched their exciting Ryzen 5 CPUs, which include two 6-core hyperthreaded chips (the 1600X and 1600) and two 4-core hyperthreaded chips (the 1500X and 1400). These CPUs are now among our recommendations on the Logical Increments homepage, marking a welcome return for AMD to the mid-range CPU space.

Long story short: We have added the the R5 1500X and 1600 to our Great tier, while the R5 1600 and 1600X now appear in our Excellent tier. As a result, the Ryzen chips have shaken up our once Intel-dominated mid-range CPU recommendations, and knocked the Intel i5-7400 completely off our list.

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AMD Ryzen 7 1700 vs. Intel i7-7700K

The Ryzen 7 1700 is — just as the 1800X and 1700X — an 8-core 16-thread processor. Unlike the X-series CPUs though, the 1700 only has an XFR (extended frequency range) of 50 Mhz, whereas both the 1800X and 1700X can boost up to 100 Mhz higher on a single a core. The clockspeeds are also lower, with the 1700 working in a range of 3.0 to 3.7 Ghz, with the TDP set at 65 W. Otherwise, all these chips are basically the same, including their ability to overclock.

In our previous articles we talked about the launch of AMD’s new Ryzen 7 CPUs, built a few systems with these new processors(here, here, and here) and compared the Ryzen 7 1800X and 1700X to their respective competitors in terms of price. Today we will take a look at how AMD’s cheapest Ryzen 7 offering, the $330 Ryzen 7 1700, compares to Intel’s price equivalent: the $340 i7-7700K.

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Building a PC with the GTX 1080 Ti

NVIDIA has just released the GTX 1080 Ti, with the company claiming that their new card is up to 35% faster than the already beastly GTX 1080 in some instances. If you’re going for an all-out gaming PC, look no further.

We’ve crafted three different PC builds to take advantage of NVIDIA’s new powerhouse graphics card: One with an ATX Full tower, one with an ATX Mid Tower, and finally a small form factor build. The ATX builds are using AMD’s newly released Ryzen 7 1800X and 1700X chips to make well-rounded workstation builds, while the SFF build will be using an i7-7700K, still the best gaming CPU.

All the builds are targeted at 1440p or 4K gaming, which is where the lower single-threaded performance of the Ryzen CPUs is less of an issue. Click on the links to go directly to the product page.

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GTX 1080 Ti Launched, Added to Logical Increments

Just two weeks following its official announcement, the GTX 1080 Ti has launched at $700, replacing the Titan X Pascal on the highest end of our graphics card recommendations. Simply put: It is the new king of graphics cards, inching out ahead of the $1,200 Titan X in overall gaming performance. On average, the new 1080 Ti is 2-3% faster than the Titan X, while priced $500 lower.

We have added the 1080 Ti to our GPU recommendations in the Exceptional, Enthusiast, Extremist, and Monstrous tiers on our homepage.

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